Hawaiian Mochi Malasadas

If you have ever been to Hawai’i, chances are that you ended up in line, somewhere waiting for hot Malasadas.
The Malasadas came to 808 with the Portuguese immigrants (hired to work on the cane fields of Hawai’i), but their origin dates back to the 1400 in the Azores Islands.
Malasada means “poorly cooked” and once you bite into one you will know why: the crunch of the sugar outside, balances perfectly the gooey interior. Their shape is round, about the size of a peach, and whether you indulge in stuffed Malasadas (usually with cream and tropical fruit) or just a plain one still warm from the fryer, you know what I mean, and why Malasadas are a National treasure.
My recipe uses MOCHI flour mix. Mochi is sweet rice flour and the ingredients makes the Malasadas core even more chewy and gooey. A true tastebuds Nirvana.
Sooooooooo…..let’s kick this new year with a boom, and let’s get the oil hot. You got some Mochi “frybaby” to do!

  • DifficultyMedium
  • CostMedium
  • Preparation time2 Hours
  • Rest time8 Hours
  • Cooking time5 Minutes
  • Serving18
  • Cooking methodFrying
  • CuisinePortuguese

Ingredients

1/2 tablespoon dry yeast
1/2 cup evaporated milk
1/3 cup granulated sugar (reserve 1 tbs of it to activate the yeast)
1/3 cup water (lukewarm, to activate the yeast)
eggs (2 or 3 depending on the size)
1 stick unsalted butter (sliced, room temperature)
1 teaspoon vanilla essence
2 cups bread flour
1/2 cup Ube Powder
1/2 teaspoon salt

COATING

2 cups granulated sugar
1/3 cup Ube Powder

Filling: (optional)

Pastry cream OR
Citrus Curds OR
Chocolate ganache

Frying oil

2 quarts of vegetable oil (Hight smoking point oils such as : grapeseed, avocado)

Tools

1

Steps

Since the Malasadas require an overnight fridge fermentation, plan accordingly.

Preparing the dough

1-In the bowl of a stand up mixer, place the yeast and 1 tbs of the sugar. Mix the lukewarm water and activate the yeast.
2-In a separate measuring cup mix the eggs (start with 2 if large) the vanilla and the evaporated milk.
3-Stir together the Mochi and regular flours, the remaining sugar and set aside.
4-When the yeast is bubbly, add the dry and the wet ingredients (#2 and #3) and mix (dough hook attachment) for about 5 minutes. The dough will be dry at first. Give it time for the sugar to act, remember you will add butter, too.
5-You will see that the gluten will start to develop when the dough is “climbing” the dough hook.
At this point add the butter one tablespoon at a time, mix for an additional 4 minutes.
6-Finally, add the salt and mix one more minutes.
7-Transfer the dough to a lightly greased bowl, and cover with clear wrap. Let it double in volume, it will take an hour or two.

Once the dough has doubled, divide it into 18 equal pieces and roll each one into a cohesive small ball.
Place the Malasadas onto a baking sheet lined with OILED parchment paper.
Cover with some saran wrap (clear wrap) and place in the refrigerator overnight.

The following day, remove the Mochi Malasadas from the fridge and let them rest at room temperature for about 1 hour prior to frying.
Meanwhile: prep the coating mix in a large bowl, by stirring together sugar and Ube powder.
Set aside.
Fry in hot oil (350F) for about 5 minutes until very dark brown.
I typically fry 3 min on one side and 2 on the other.
Transfer the Malasadas to a tray lined with paper towel to absorb the excess oil, about 30 seconds.

Immediately dunk the still hot malasadas into the bowl with the sugar and Ube mix.
Roll them to coat.
NOTE: if you try to do this operation with cold Malasadas, the sugar won’t stick.

Option ONE: cut the Mochi Malasadas and spread some of your favorite jam. Devour.

Option TWO: stuff the Mochi Malasada with citrus curds or pastry cream using an injector or a long tip.

Option THREE: skip the Ube and make a snow white Mochi Malasadas (substitute with Mochi mix)

Option FOUR: enjoy them plain or with salted butter

Option FIVE: The most decadent of all. Make a LUTHER sandwich. The play on sweet and savory is so amazingly satisfying.

Option SIX: bring the Mochi Malasadas to a party and be the most popular person attending.

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